Oct. 22: DC Radio Hosts Sports Law Expert Kevin Goldberg On Access Restrictions To Coverage

Kevin Goldberg

Kevin Goldberg

Press freedom and sports law expert Kevin Goldberg described major new requirements by sports teams on media coverage on the Oct. 22 DC Update edition of My Technology Lawyer Radio. The show is available via the link, which includes past shows.

Goldberg this fall delivered a compelling lecture at the National Press Club here entitled, “The Price of Admission Gets Higher: Leagues Asking for More in Exchange for Access.” He explains why this is important to the public: “Sports are no longer just sports. In many communities, they are the news. These restrictive credentials have been adopted by all facets of the entertainment industry, at all levels.”

Update is co-hosted by the show’s founder and business radio pioneer Scott Draughon and by Washington commentator Andrew Kreig. The hosts begin the show with an update on Washington policy news affecting the nation’s business, politics and quality of life.

Goldberg, a leader in the field, described how the sports industry has learned from other segments of the entertainment industry to restrict media coverage to enhance profits and image. This greatly affects public understanding of sports teams at the professional and college level ─ with the new restrictions spreading even to high school or lower level games in some locales. Among his examples:

• Publications must agree that te league, venue or event own all copyright and other interest in the photographs, audio or video taken at the game, with the newspaper getting a license to use the work for narrowly defined news purposes only.

• Leagues and events require removal of photos, audio and video from a website.
Example 1: The National Football League imposed a daily limit of 45 seconds of audio or video interviews with players or coaches. It bans live and post-24-hour coverage.
Example 2: Major League Baseball bans live coverage and pictures after 72 hours unless linked to a specific game being covered.

• Little League World Series claimed ownership of all regional playoff photos, banning free ones.

• Louisiana High School Athletic Association barred credentials to girls playoffs photographers unless “newsprint.”

Also, Goldberg described potential solutions in specific situations for sports writers and generally.

About Kevin Goldberg
Kevin M. Goldberg is Special Counsel with Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth, PLC. His expertise is in First Amendment, Copyright and Trademark issues, especially those relating to newspaper and Internet publishing. He regularly advocates issues involving freedom of speech on behalf of press organizations. Kevin also consults regularly with these organizations concerning the continued freedom of speech on the Internet, focusing on issues such as regulation and voluntary implementation of blocking software. Kevin assists newspapers and television and radio stations in prepublication review of stories for possible legal problems. In 2006, he was inducted into the National Freedom of Information Hall of Fame as one of 56 members for his service in pursuit of open government. Contact.

About Fletcher, Heald and Hildreth
Founded in 1936, Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth provides comprehensive legal services in the field of telecommunications. Details.

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4 Responses to “Oct. 22: DC Radio Hosts Sports Law Expert Kevin Goldberg On Access Restrictions To Coverage”

  1. Ken Rynne Says:

    Andrew – interesting story and a sign of the times. On a related issue of controlling the message, players are also facing restrictions – I heard an NPR story recently on restrictions on football players’ tweets,

  2. Barbara Heine Says:

    Andrew – interesting look-behind-the-scenes. I’ve also read that players have mixed feelings about posting tweets, based on legal and other issues. Keep up the good investigatory work!

  3. CB Says:

    Andrew – interesting look-behind-the-scenes. I’ve also read that players have mixed feelings about posting tweets, based on legal and other issues. Keep up the good investigatory work!

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